Emergency Disaster Survival Basics

Emergency Disaster Survival Basics

From time to time we hear of catastrophic events and disasters in far away places, but the news gets more and more unsettling the closer these tragedies get in proximity to where we live, as well as their increasing frequency. We operate on a daily basis mostly without worry of any major changes in our living quarters or environment. It would in fact be counterproductive to become unnecessarily preoccupied with a pessimistic view of the future possibilities of disaster. By the same token, it is a big risk not making any advance preparation for. To be without any emergency survival basics could be life threatening.

Homeless girl searches for ways of a survival on a city dump. emergency survival

In this modern era our survival is weighted most heavily toward how we fare in the workplace and our ability to bring home a paycheck. We rely on society’s highly interdependent, evolved system of specialization. Drawing upon each of the various components as needed brings us enhanced utility with added convenience to boot.

As opposed to earlier civilizations, we trade for and gather from an ever-increasing base of available goods and services that have the deceptive appearance of being infinite in supply. It’s easy to think that these basic supplies are always going to be available when you can walk into any store and find all that anyone would ever need. But, what it you can’t get to that store? Do you have enough food and water stored up to last you until you can get to a store? How long can you last if you’re put into that situation?

When disaster strikes, you have nobody to rely on but yourself, and your survival is no longer considered to be a “hobby.” Your forethought, preparation, and careful planning will dramatically increase your chances for survival. You will be thankful for your own advance consideration of a variety of possible future disasters. This may even include things such as unemployment or underemployment.

First thing you need to do is to sit down with your spouse and start making out lists and a plan. You’ll need lists of everything you’ll need to survive a disaster like food and water, medication and medical supplies, clothing and blankets, equipment and tools.

What food are you going to want to keep in your emergency survival kit? You need food sealed in airtight packages that doesn’t need to be refrigerated. You’ll want enough to feed your family for a minimum of 3 days or 72 hours. Keep that in mind when you consider how much water you’ll want to store away. Also keep that 72 hour threshold in mind when you make up a list of clothing and blankets. Experts advise to keep a tool and equipment kit with the necessary tools you’ll need for a camping trip. Make out a separate list of your medications, medical supplies you’ll need and directives if you’re under the care of a doctor.

After you’ve made out your lists, you’ll need to come up with a plan of where you should meet up as a family(if necessary), who’s going to get the kids from school, where you should go depending on your circumstances and what you should do. These decisions are going to depend on the type of disaster as much as your needs. For example, evacuation from a wild fire is going to create a different scenario than that of an earthquake or a flood. You won’t be able to meet up in the same place, and you may need different supplies or equipment. More and more people are packing more than one kit for the different types of disasters that they may be susceptible to.

You’ll want to get your family together and go over your plan and lists, make any adjustments after their input the get started putting together the supplies, equipment and gear that you’ll be needing when that time comes. Most importantly, you’ll want to do this as soon as possible if not sooner because you never know when disaster is going to strike and your only guarantee to survive it is through preparation.

To Be Fully Prepared, We Recommend The Following:

emergency survival

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